ARCHIVE 1998

limits_home.gif (2310 bytes)webimage/sector/no.gif
sector_home.gif (1688 bytes)              Peggy Bouchet is part of the Sector "No Limits Team"

SECTOR NO LIMITS
PRESS RELEASES


MAY 28TH  LONDON

AT 10:15GMT Christophe Hebert of Columbia River telephoned the Ocean
Rowing Society HQ in London and reported that Peggy Bouchet arrived in
Guadeloupe at 3:45 local time May 28th.
She is not injured and is described as being "well".
The Sector No Limits is still at sea (overturned) and Christophe is now
heading an effort to try and retrieve her.
The Argos beacon is still transmiting the location of the Sector No Linits


May 28... Yesterday, after 79 days at sea and an exemplary crossing, Peggy Bouchet
became victim of a capsize which forced her to resign 120 miles away from the
arriva point.  As soon as the distress message was received at 13:50 GMT, a plane was
chartered by the organisation to locate Peggy. After two and a half hours of
search they saw an emergency flare that was set off by Peggy, thus allowing
the rescue of to begin. Peggy  was cradled on the hull of the boat. Meanwhile,
a plane chartered by the operational center of maritime rescue in Antilles, dropped                                                      a life raft near Peggy. (An incredible feat by the pilot...)

By that time, the "Marine Nationale" and the company "Nouvelles Frontieres"
were proving their solidarity by sending their boats to the location. In
the end , a Cyprian ship, the Peramos, enroute to the  US  rescued
the shipwrecked Peggy Bouchet.

During this delicate manoeuvre, Peggy remained remarkably calm as Gerard
d'Aboville explained it, "Like all your friends, I felt a great relief to
know you were safe and rescued after those hours of anxiety. I can only
imagine the great disappointment you are feeling so close to your dream goal
and so close to being rewarded for your superb performance"

Gerard also said "Like everyone who knows the ocean, I know how fragile
human initiatives can be and how cruel such a misfortune can be, when the
goal is believed to be achieved. However, I will remember the incredible
stubborness you demonstrated since you left as well as your courage and
your calm during your rescue."

Once on board the Cypriot ship, Peggy sent a message in which she talks
about her terrible experience, "After having talked to Christophe Hebert of
Columbia River, I had an imense fear. I was closing the hatch when suddenly
a very strong wave capsized the boat. Being trapped under the boat by my
harness I was unable to breath and I thought that I was going to die.I had
to take my ARGOS beacon and trigger it. Then I climbed onto the hull to wait
for help. The boat was filling up with water little by little, and I decided
to dive into the rear cabin. I took the beacon sarsat. I had to dive
15-times, risking each time to be knocked down by hitting the sides, due to
the strength of the boat"

Peggy went on to say "Then no news…. A plane flew over  without seeing me.
I dove again to get my emergency flares. I had to open the storage
compartment but I was afraid of filling the boat with more water. I hardly
managed to do it and I prayed for the plane to come back. Phew…I lit every
single emergency flare that I had. A plane dropped a liferaft and I was rescued by
a ship. I managed to hang my beacon on the boat just in time. You can't
imagine how happy I am to be safe. After such an experience, you realize
that life hinges on little things.

One more second and the hatch would have been closed, well …one more day and…"

I kiss you all
Peggy, happy to be with you.


Press release 26/05/98

After 78 days at sea this morning, Peggy was 120 miles away from the
designated finishing line situated between the east point of the Desirade
and the east point of Marie Galante.

Depending on the weather conditions, Peggy should reach the quay of the
marina Bas du Fort at Pointe a Pitre (Guadeloupe) on Friday morning, the
29th of May.

Out of communication with land for a week, Peggy has managed to repair her
standard M (satellite telephone) and could finally contact her team on land.
"I am very happy to be able to communicate again after being without any
link with land for many days. My standard M is giving me some relief. I
wasn't missing the human contact but I was not worried because the goal was
near. The excitement of the arrival is a very nice feeling but I have some
regrets that the crossing is nearly over. I will never forget the sensation
of the Sector No limits surfing at 4 knots under the silver moon…" Peggy
said.

The weather conditions are now particularly good and Peggy and her boat
Sector No Limits should benefit from east winds until the arrival.

The communication team following Peggy from Paris has flown to Guadeloupe
and settled in a hotel in St Francois. The parents, the friends and the
journalists are already over there waiting with eagerness to welcome the
young rower and to recognise her performance of being the first woman to row
any Ocean…
May 14 Press Release

Only 675 Miles left. Peggy may be physically "worn-out" as
well as impatient to arrive but her progress, up to 55 Miles on some days,
underlines her stubbornness. She said in her last fax that her pains,
especially in her back, have become more pronounced and that the discomfort
of her bunk is affecting her sleep.

The sun that gives her energy is nonetheless, her greatest enemy. The
overwhelming midday heat forces Peggy to take shelter in the cabin.

"Heat record was broken today: more than 38°C. I've rowed 3 hours this
morning and I will row tonight because the heat is now unbearable. I am
lying at the far end of my cabin to avoid the sun but it is like being in a
sauna!" Peggy said.

Peggy resumes rowing when the cool of the evening comes.
"Last night, while the moon was rising, the wind was blowing in gusts and
speeding the Sector No Limits. At nightfall, the sky was marvellous. I
contemplated the sky until midnight realising that I was going to miss the
open sea and the solitude." Peggy said.

In spite of weather conditions that are sometimes irregular (south-east
winds of 10-15 knots) and a swell from south/south-east, Peggy manages to
maintain her progress around 40 Miles per day. A favourable and regular east
wind (around 20 Knots) should be with Peggy this weekend and this will aid
her progress as well as bring relief from the heat.

Regarding communications: disappointment for Peggy. Her satellite phone has
broken down again. She is back in a wordless world. However, she still has
the opportunity to take photos, make videos, and to write. "Above all, I
want to keep souvenirs of the beautiful sunsets…"


May 07 Press Release

THE LAST 1000 MILES


Since the 7th of May, less than 1000 Miles are between Peggy and Antigua.
One third of the total distance is remaining for Peggy to get rewarded and
to succeed.

There is another good news: Peggy's satellite phone has been repaired!
Although working in difficult and uncomfortable conditions, Peggy has found
the fault after much dismantling and testing and she can communicate again
with her team in Issy les Moulineaux in France. This was a relief for her
even though she has become used to her isolation: "the fact that I couldn't
hear any voice didn't bother me: I could imagine the people when I read the
faxes. Now, I am in a world where imagination has replaced the speech".


Peggy was calmer and more determined than ever: "The most important thing is
to forget the pains, the fears, and to keep on fighting turning down the
discouragement every day and at every oar stroke." Peggy said.

Recently, her progress has accelerated ; a sign than her energy and
motivation is up. The average daily progress is approximately 45-50 Miles,
which is a remarkable rhythm with such irregular weather conditions.

The weather conditions should get better in the near future with strong
East/Southeast winds. The only tricky problem Peggy will have to cope with
is the heavy sea coming from the North and the weakening winds forecasted
for the next four days.

After nearly two months at sea, Peggy said what her impressions were: "I
have forgotten all the odours and the flagrancy of everything. My life on
board hinges on the light and the impulses: I wake up when the sun rises, I
eat when I want, and it is a behaviour close to the one of an animal. The
only time I look at my watch is when I want to be sure I have rowed 10 hours
in the day… I feel that if I wasn't writing everyday on my Logbook what
happened, my feelings, my souvenirs, the position, the distance done,
everything would fly away…

Peggy on board of her Sector No Limits".


March Press Releases

DATE: 26/03/98

PEGGY BOUCHET HAS REACHED HER SIXTEENTH DAY AT SEA.
"AFTER DEPARTURE THE UMBILICAL CORD THAT TIED ME TO LAND WAS
SEVERED-DECLARED THE FRENCH ATHLETE OF THE SECTOR NO LIMITS TEAM-, I FEEL
INCREDIBLY FREE ABOARD THE SECTOR NO LIMITS. THE FIRST TWO DAYS WERE NEEDED
TO GET USED TO STAYING OUT AT SEA. EVEN NOW, EVERY MORNING, I FEEL AS THOUGH
I'VE SPENT THE NIGHT IN A BLENDER. THE DROPS OF CONDENSATION THAT DRIP DOWN
FROM THE CABIN CEILING OFTEN AWAKEN ME. AFTER BREAKFAST AND WASHING UP, I
START ROWING. AFTERT A FEW DAYS OF NAVIGATION, I COULD FINALLY REMOVE MY
JACKET AND LONG PANTS BECAUSE I WASN'T DRENCHED EVERY THREE MINUTES BY THE
SPRAY OF THE WAVES" PEGGY'S DAILY PROGRAM CONSISTS OF NINE HOURS OF ROWING,
WITH A BRIEF PAUSE EVERY TWO HOURS AND A LONG BREAK IN THE MIDDLE OF THE DAY
FOR LUNCH. ONCE A DAY PEGGY SWITCHES ON STANDARD C TO RECEIVE MESSAGES FROM
PARIS HEADQUARTERS. IN THE EVENING SHE FILLS OUT HER LOG, READS AND LISTENS
TO SOME MUSIC. ASIDE FROM THE INEVITABLE CONSEQUENCES OF HER INTENSE
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, PEGGY FEELS GREAT. EVEN SOLITUDE DOESN'T SEEM TO HAVE
AFFECTED HER MORAL AND DETERMINATION. "THERE IS TWO TYPES OF SOLITUDE
HERE-EXPLAINED PEGGY-: THEREIS THE SOLITUDE OF THE SEA AND OF THE NIGHT. THE
NIGHT AMPLIFIES EVERY LITTLE NOISE, AND YOUR HEARING PREVAILS OVER ALL THE
PTHER SENSES. THAT'S WHY I OFTEN WANT TO ROW IN THE DARK."


ATHLETES LIKE PEGGY BOUCHET WHO BELONG TO THE SECTOR NO LIMITS TEAM ARE
PERFECT EXAMPLES OF THE SPIRIT BEHIND THE NO LIMITS PHILOSOPHY IN WHICH
HUMANS ARE THE ABSOLUTE CENTER OF ATTENTION: THE INDIVIDUAL SETS OUT ON A
PERSONAL, INNER JOURNEY THAT LEADS HIM TO TEST HIS PHISICAL AND MENTAL
LIMITS WITH DETERMINATION, WILLPOWER AND CHARACTER.

Date: 10/03/1998


EXTREME SPORTS PEGGY BOUCHET, THE FIRST WOMAN TO ROW ACROSS THE ATLANTIC
OCEAN

- PEGGY BOUCHET, THE FRENCH ROWER OF THE NO LIMITSā TEAM IS THE FIRST WOMAN
TO ATTEMPT TO ROW ACROSS THE ATLANTIC OCEAN, SET OUT TODAY AT 8:45 GMT FROM
PUERTO DE MOGAN, HEADING 200° SOUTH

- WEATHER AND SEA CONDITIONS WERE GOOD FOR THE DEPARTURE. "IT IS IMPORTANT
TO REACH 20° LATITUDE NORTH FAST" SUGGESTED PEGGY'S ROUTING ADVISOR,
FRENCHMAN LOUIS BODIN

- "I'D LIKE TO THANK EVERYONE WHO BELIEVES IN ME-PEGGY SAID BEFORE SHE SET
OUT TO ROW - STARTING WITH MY FAMILY, FRIENDS, GERARD D'ABOVILLE AND MY
SPONSORS SECTOR SPORT WATCHES AND NO LIMITSā WEAR"

- SECTOR NO LIMITS - THE ROWBOAT IN WHICH THE 24 YEAR-OLD PEGGY BOUCHET (WHO
STUDIED AT PLYMOUTH UNIVERSITY-UK) WILL ATTEMPT TO BE THE FIRST WOMAN TO ROW
ACROSS THE ATLANTIC OCEAN - IS 8 METERS LONG AND 1.4 METER WIDE. IT WEIGHS
250 KG EMPTY AND 600 KG FULLY LOADED. IT'S MADE OF PLYWOOD LINED WITH EPOXY
RESIN COATING.


Puerto de Mogan, Gran Canaria (Spain), March 10th, 1998, Peggy Bouchet - the
Ocean rower who aims to be the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean solo
- set out today from Puerto de Mogan, on the southern coast of Gran Canaria
(Spain) aboard her Ocean rowboat Sector No Limitsā. It is expected to be
approximately a three month voyage covering an estimated 3 000 miles (5500
Km) on the route to the West Indies. She left land at 8:45, when a small
dinghy towed her just outside the harbour. For the first 5 miles Peggy was
accompanied by her supporters boats. Weather and sea conditions were fairly
good and expected to remain this way for the next days. Peggy said: "I must
have at least four days of good weather to get away from land, this is vital
because in case of storm I could be pushed on shore unable to control my
boat." Louis Bodin, will supply Peggy with weather forecasts and routing
advice, is confident she will get away from land safely; the expected
Anti-Cyclon is on a stable position. For the next six days he has forcast
Northeasterly winds from 15 to 25 knots. "It is important to reach 20°
latitude North as soon as possible, to enter the main stream of the Trade
Winds" he reported in his last bulletin to Peggy that she head towards 200°
South for the first 10-12 days. Gerard d'Aboville was in Gran Canaria to
assist the French rower during her final preparations on land. D'Aboville a
member of the Sector No Limits Team is the only man to have rowed solo
across Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, is Peggy Bouchet's consultant for this
project. "Today, after two years of preparation and training - the French
athlete of the SECTOR NO LIMITSā Team said before her departure - I' m
finally ready to set out, I'd like to thank everyone who assisted me until
now and believed in me, above all my family, friends and the sponsors SECTOR
and NO LIMITSā. I'd especially like to thank Gerard d'Aboville for his
valuable advice. "I have supplies for at least three months - stated the
24-year-old French rower - and my schedule requires me to cover an average
daily distance of 33 miles (61 kilometers). Therefore, I'll have to row at
least nine hours per day and stay out of the sun in the hottest hours. I'll
also have to keep in touch with my staff on land, monitor my route and keep
myself constantly updated on the weather situation." Sector No Limitsā - the
name of Peggy's boat - is made of plywood Epoxy resin-coated. Eight meters
long and 1.4 meter wide, it weighs 250Kg when empty and 600 kg with a full
load. The boat, under another name, has already been used on a transatlantic
crossing along the northern route. With the support of SECTOR and NO
LIMITSā, that provided d'Aboville's consultancy and the necessary technical
assistance, Peggy Bouchet has modified the boat, making it safer and
adapting it to suit her personal needs. Sector No Limitsā has a custom-made
rowing seat and the most advanced navigation and transmission equipment such
as a telex and satellite phone. The rower's equipment will include a
personal emergency signalling device supplied by Service Argos, which can
transmit her position at sea to within less than 1/10 of mile, and a
miniature floating device that can be worn on her belt that will also
transmit her position in case of emergency. Like all athletes of the SECTOR
NO LIMITSā Team, the first woman to attempt to row across the Atlantic Ocean
is also wearing a SECTOR watch strapped to her wrist (Peggy has the SECTOR
450 Chrono Swiss). She also has a complete assortment of NO LIMITSā garments
chosen for their exceptional breathability, resistance to water and
durability.ā

PRESS OFFICE:

Press contact during crossing:COLUMBIA RIVER - Mr. Cristophe Hebert
TEL+331 4736 3316- FAX +331 4736 0264 e-mail: columbia@slj.fr

SECTOR NO LIMTSā Team Intll. Press Office-ISM Italia- Ms. Francesca Bossola
Tel.+392733403 - Fax.+3927382853 - E-mail: ismitalia@planet.it

Video footage: Nefertiti Production, Mr Herve Borde - Tel. +3345773442
-Fax.+33145774247

Photos contact: Hoa' Qui, Mr. Michel Buntz - Tel. +33148284446

Website: http://www.oceanrowing.com - Ocean Rowing Society
Mr. Kenneth Crutchlow - Executive Director e-mail: director@oceanrowing.com

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