.

     

 

 

                 The ORS Int. is the official adjudicator of ocean rowing records for Guinness World Records

 


November   7-10   11-20   21-30
December   1-10   11-20   21-31

November 2002
22 November
23 November
24 November
25 November
26 November
28 November

30 November

Ray and Jenny Jardine: news from the route
Day 23 Nov 30 07:00 GMT
Our weather has taken a turn for the better. The progression of squalls has ceased, and now we're experiencing a different kind of rain, in the form of a light drizzle. To us, this is a 100% improvement in conditions. Last night, we even had starry skies overhead, which made for some very beautiful rowing.

[ed. note: Ray tried to relate another tale involving the dreaded container ships, but the satellite phone cut out. Until he can reiterate, suffice it to say these ships seem to be the scourge of the tropical Atlantic ocean rower. R&J appear vigilant to the danger, and are using every means available to remain safe.]

UP

Day 21. Nov 28 at 07:00 GMT
Squally conditions continue, with heaps of rain. Very wet out here, but not considerably cold, so we dry quickly when it does relent.

Seas have continued to be rather moily, due to shifting winds. Even a 20 degree change in wind direction creates very lumpy conditions, making for challenging rowing. But judging by the cirrus cloud behavior in the last few hours, a front appears to have passed, or is passing, and with it we are experiencing trade winds for the first time on the journey. 

Despite the weather, or because of it, we're having a great time out here. It's a wonderful adventure indeed.

UP

Day 19. Nov 26 07:00 GMT
It was a day of light and variable winds, punctuated with rain and sudden squalls from time to time, and cloud cover that has been constant and heavy. Ultimately, though, the tailwind was sufficient for us to make good mileage.

As of this morning, we are about 80 miles from our waypoint destination of 20 deg N, 30 deg W. At that point we'll change course slightly and head directly for Barbados. So part of today's excitement lay in getting ever loser to an imaginary point in the vast expanse of sea.

We don't do as much rowing at night as during the day. For one, darkness is about the same length of time as daylight. And sometimes it's so dark that we can see neither our oars nor the waves, even though the waves are often white. Our visual sense is much reduced, and so we compensate, rowing instead by feel and by listening to the waves as they break along the keel of the boat. But when conditions permit, which is usually at night, we sometimes listen to a mini-disc containing books-on-tape and also music. One of the selections we recently heard was "The Hobbit," among Ray's favorite stories.
Ray

UP

Day 18. Nov 25 07:00 GMT
Lumpy conditions yesterday due to the wind switching direction back and forth a few times. Made for some difficult rowing, because the water isn't always where we'd like it to be, under the boat. Also the water maker is sucking air when the seas are rough, but we have a device which removes that air, so it's not a problem for us. Although, during the night we had about 2 hours that were so rough that we couldn't row at all. We were being pitched right off our rowing seats, which has actually happened to us a few times throughout the trip. So we just had to sit there and steer. But other than that 2 hour period, we had very good rowing, with a favorable wind, so were able to make our miles.

We continue to have cloud cover, which is quite nice because it keeps us cool. Every now and then, we get a hole in the sky, and the sun glares down at us, offering a glimmer of what to expect whenever it finally comes out full force - it's gonna be hot! We do have an ocean to jump into to cool off once in a while.

While Ray was rowing last night, had a flying fish smack him in the arm. Didn't get a look at it, but must have been of a pretty good size. It fell down onto the rowing deck, and moved itself through the scupper and was gone. The confrontation wasn't startling; it's just one of those humorous asides that happen out here. Good thing it got out, because otherwise it might have landed on the dinner table next morning: all our fresh food is gone. We do have plenty of corn pasta, however.
Ray

UP

Day 17. Nov 24 07:00 GMT
During the day we had 10-12 knots of wind on the starboard quarter, making for lumpy seas and slow going. Lots of cloud cover during the day and the night.
 During the night the wind was from the NE, 15-20 dead on stern. And so we sped along until about 5 am, when we hit the 60 mile point, so we both went to bed and slept for 2 hours.
 We have had some flying fish landing in the boat, mostly small ones of an inch or less in length, but there was one eight inch fish, which Jenny scooped into her hands and returned to the seas.
 We witnessed some beautiful moonbows during the night. With so much cloud cover lately, we saw just a brief, heartening glimpse of the recent Leonid meteor shower.

UP

Day 16. Nov 23 07:00 GMT
Today we had winds aft about 30 degrees, coming in more on our starboard quarter. This persisted throughout the day and night, slowing us down a little. We like to have that wind dead on stern. Nonetheless, all is well.
 Thanks to all of our friends who have sent text messages to us, including our skydiving friends Astrin [sp?], Gabe, Betsy, Gordo, Johnny Eagle, Chris and Ray, and Brett. Special thanks to Chris and Ray for their helpful suggestion, which was, "Try to row in a straight line." Thanks, we really appreciate that super tip!
Jenny

UP

Day 15.  Nov 22 07:00 GMT
Ray and Jenny say they are going great. Following is Ray's account. With his permission, I will now be editing what either he or Jenny relates to me by phone, with an eye toward keeping the comments in the first person (theirs).
Take care, folks,
- Brett

"We continue to make excellent progress, mainly because of a favorable wind from NE. On whole, conditions are good, although we are having quite a bit of rain, especially at night; and now that we've entered the tropics, the rain seems to be heavier. However, it is not particularly cold, and because of the wind we dry fairly quickly once the rain relents.
 Following one particular storm, we found that half an inch of rainwater had collected in the boat's footwell. And once or twice a heavy rain has persuaded us to hole up in the cabin and wait it out. But most of the time we're better off simply rowing through the weather, since the steamy cabin merely drenches us in our own sweat.
 Very beautiful out here. We are having a wonderful adventure."
- Ray

UP


  1983-2018 Oceanrowing.com

.