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December 5-19  26-30 (restart)
 
January  01-10   11-20   21-31
 
February  01-10

February
February 11
February 12
February 13
February 14
February 15
February 18
February 19
February 20
February 21
February 24

News from the route

The following text is via computer translation program, so expect some minor inaccuracies.
For original text in French go to http://www.antreizh.org/fr_lejournal.asp


February 24 Sardine benefits finally from the joys of the beach!!!

From Friday afternoon I have had my feet on dry land, but not always my head follows them. The reception at the Hall of Honour of the Harbour office of Pointe-а-Pitre was imposing, and I tried to thank Monsieur de Saint Paul and all his team for their efficiency and their kindness. 

Thank you ever so much, my Bretons, who awaited me with the sounds of a bagpipe and bombards... After all these days spent at sea far from my native land, this seemed to me heavenly good!

To all those, who took time to send small messages to me via Internet big, big mercy!!! You will never imagine how precious they were when reaching me, especially on the days, when my morale was getting down. I had never imagined having so many supporters of such a range of age.

Now, when «some peace returned to the Marina», I will enjoy well a few days of deserved rest and will return on my native land in March. Promise, I will have a little bit more clear ideas to tell you about this adventure, which is worth all the gold of the world. 

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February 21 Record is broken

Portsdefrance.com and all her team are happy and proud to inform that Anna finished her row on Friday, February 21st at 02:22 GMT, setting new record time for women solo crossing of the Atlantic ocean - 56 days 13 hours 09 minutes!!!

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February 20 Land! Land?
Wednesday, 8 p.m. Edouard PAULET, Ronan QUEMERE, Frederic MAILLARD and Bruno MAINGUY are in ocean since Monday. They now have some impression about what Anna had to survive. Who of them was seasick? - we won't specify, not to offend anybody... Strong seas. "I'm sick", - says Fred - "Certainly, yes, the light is superb, pictures turn out excellent!.." Anna's course is deviated to the South, we hope it will be corrected during this night. We are in 40 miles from Desirade. Anne is approaching her desired purpose... Will she surprise us appearing in better form than her support team?

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February 19 TO FEEL THE ISLANDS! 
Anne: "I am full of happiness to share this atmosphere of the large space with the team of the ship that came to meet me. After having appreciated so much the performance of the sea and the sun offered to me all alone, to just a lonely woman throughout the whole journey, I feel today a great desire of communion with all those, whom I love, and I wish that we live together through the last moments of this crossing. Meet all of you Friday midday in Pointe а Pitre !!! 

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February 18 CUCKOO!
Visual contact at 14:00 with the team, that left Pointe а Pitre yesterday morning. Heavy seas. But all is well. Being super satisfied to see the team, Anne rows with the smile. Predicted landing is expected on Thursday – to arrive at St Fransois (eastern point of Guadeloupe) between midday and 20h.; and to arrive at Pointe-a-Pitre Thursday evening.

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February 15 Depart of the TEAM
The TEAM is leaving tomorrow morning. With the time difference, which is five hours, Anne's site will not be updated before Monday evening.
The latest news from Anne, that we received before our departure, is not excellent at all.
Uncomfortable head swell, a wind of force 6 [ 22-27 knots] and her arm which was nearly broken under strike of a panel in the cabin, that has fallen down heavily on Anne's elbow.
The pain is intensive. Looks like the way left to the finish is going to be a long-long martyrdom. 

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February 14 Reflections
"It is necessary for me to avoid immersion into a soft euphoria and to concentrate my whole attention on rowing, so that to organize the best way possible this major last week of my journey.
In theory, I should preserve this fast alternation between rowing and rest, trying not to exceed my 12-14 hours' daily efforts - I could foresee, that the proximity of islands can be too tempting to tilt the balance in the favour of higher speed.
While rowing I think much, definitely much. I try to analyze all the good and the bad moments of the crossing; and to understand what sort of experience - positive or negative - it has brought into my life. In fact I don't know for certain if I have had more of happy moments than of miserable ones, because the human memory has always a tendency to rather forget the worst. And yet the terrible cyclone of the first week, and 5 days, that I spent in the small cabin like in a shaker, have left a deep mark in my memory and do return to my mind very often.. On the other hand there were so many beautiful sun-sets, so many exciting meetings with sea animals; or just awareness of the greatest privilege to simply be at sea alone…Strange as it may sound, but it appears to be quite a difficult task to make a choice between the best and the worst.
As to understanding of what is contributed to my life from the experience I currently live, I think that to explore and to discover some sides of my own self can be considered to be the most remarkable gain of all. In the difficult moments (sometimes even terrifying), you quickly find yourself naked in front of an avalanche of concerns. In extreme situations it is impossible to cheat or to lie to your own self. You become true, natural and you make a discovery - actually you find your real ego, you learn about yourself something you would never suspect to exist. I saw myself sometimes week and miserable, unable to go on rowing, when it was turning to become unbearably oppressive…, or sometimes, to my great surprise, I was resolving some problems completely new for me, which I believed myself unable to face. 
But the present does not fit for assessments, even less for euphoria. To enjoy a beautiful arrival you should prepare it and then gain. 
Thus, all I have to do now is to r o w again, still to r o w and r o w...!!! "

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February 13 380 miles to land.
“So, here I am - at last! – on the final straight line, and the more I approach my target, the more fatigue I feel 
The weather conditions, however, are favourable, with east wind of 15-20 knots, which faithfully accompanies me since several days; and a generous swell, that pushes the boat in the right direction. 
But I’m getting more and more problems with sleep and, in addition to this, the problem with tendonitis of my wrist…So now I gained a kind of general physical lassitude, that cannon be smoothed even by relative proximity to islands.
In theory, these good conditions should last until I arrive, and I envisage thus to put-foot-on- -land between February 21st and 23rd.
And still, in order for everything to go normal way, I will redouble vigilance. Because when approaching the land, swells have tendency to rebound on higher levels, and than, the effect caused by resonance - to return, forming waves extremely dangerous, so much improbable and twisted they are.
I thus live in completely stupid fear to miss the manoeuvre of arrival and, for the first time in my dream the last night, I saw my boat, safe and sound, having escaped all the breakings and other terrible corals which girdle the Eastern coast on the majority of West-Indian Islands. This dream suddenly made me realize, how much I‘ve got attached to my dear CONNETABLE and the more time passes, the more I treat her like a friend, while speaking to her to congratulate with a good surfing or encouraging her when she seems to be taken aback by a violent wave. 
And one more dream – just an exaggerated impression – that the whole Guadeloupe is awaiting my arrival. I started to have contacts by phone with friends or journalists of Pointe-А-Pitre and all of them were encouraging and reassuring me, that they have prepared some great things to celebrate the finish of my journey. Do I want it or not, but all these ideas about my arrival give me a funny impression, that it goes not about me, because after 2 months of loneliness, its too difficult for me now to think about anything on land or out of my boat." 

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February 12 Repartition of the ballast.
Maintaining her routine, Anne is profiting from the pauses, - which, according to her own decision, she is having for two hours after every two hours of rowing, - to arrange the staff on board. When the stocks of food have been diminished considerably, Marc, the designer and boat builder of The Connetable, consulted Anne to re-arrange the remainder of her food to the rear cabin - a repartition of the weight will be useful in preventing the boat from turning with her side to the wave, while sliding down. Indeed, the strong swell which will rebound closer to the Antilles, will make the next days quite uncomfortable. For a reasonable point Anne redoubles vigilance - not to get a surprise from a stronger than the others wave – a misfortune which would be a pity if happened so close to the goal.
The tendonitis of the wrist goes up now along the elbow. With each stroke of oars a sharp pain puts the things on the edge of tolerance. 
But Anne is full of courage and her amazingly good mood during the last days is due to the fact that her complete TEAM OF SUPPORT leaves for Guadeloupe Sunday, February16th! Some of them will embark the next Monday - to go to meet and encourage her. What an excitement in store for all involved in this meeting! And we’ll do our best to update the site from Pointe-А-Pitre as often as possible.

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February 11 Tired!!! 
These last days, the wind took the curious practice to lie down with the sun and then to reappear with the premier gleams of the day. Having no support from the wind, CONNETABLE thus rolls all during the night edge on edge and the more tired Anne gets, the more difficult it becomes for her to get asleep. Moreover, the metallic order, which actuates the rudder, knocks in the partition of each movement of the swell and the shocks are propagated in the structure of the hull, which makes case of resonance when the cabin is closed. Staying locked inside the cabin is the war of nerves, especially when there comes to be added this mechanical drumming of showers, that cross my portion of sky throughout the night. I do not miss fresh water, but as these small tropical rains sprinkle us only at night, its impossible to take a good shower because afterwards it becomes almost cold. 
In the morning, the wind returns and the sun puts the day to heat, and a good east breeze of 15- 20 knots starts again to push the boat. So, there is no reason for me to complain, ‘cause despite this night deceleration, my CONNETABLE cuts down her 50 miles daily and that is not so bad at all. Not to slow down the rate, I tried to row on after the sunset, but the nights currently are as black as ink and I condemned this experiment as too much dangerous.
The closer I am approaching my goal, the more I realise how much I have lost of my physical freshness. From ten to twelve hours of rowing and too little of true sleep - to erase the 46-day efforts’ tiredness, - induce to the greatest vigilance. 
I cannot help thinking again about upsetting of Peggy Bouchet, who, next to the coast of Martinique, let herself be caught by a vicious wave, that came nobody knows where from. I feel that such a misfortune could well have happened to me and I multiply precautionary measures. No more hatches open , even slightly ajar, or exits without harness. To make certain not to remain blocked under the boat in the event of upsetting, I have enlarged the rope of my harness and I stand by to meet any unexpectedness. This idea of upsetting, which doesn't leave me any more, makes me think as well about Emmanuel Coindre, who capsized 17 times during his recent crossing the Atlantic from USA to France. May be when it happens several times one gets used to it , but I have less and less desire for trying this experience on my own. 
According to the information I have got I should preserve good conditions of sea until I approach the Antilles, with east wind of 20 knots and a favourable swell well installed all along my course. I thus see myself approaching the land and in my dreams I imagine more and more clearly the moment when I will find all those who came to meet me. In fact what really excites me most of all is neither the sight of islands, nor of the palm trees on the so much desirable coast, but the presence of my close relatives and that of my partners of Society CHANCERELLE, getting ready to look for me intently at the open sea.
I am dreaming about a good bath full of these odorous fumes that girls do appreciate so much; and about a night of a true sleep: without cargo ships, showers, brutal wake-ups, 
surging waves…
Go! Only 10 – 15 days of effort…and the dream comes true!

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